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Female Triathletes May Face Health Problems Such as Incontinence

Female Triathletes and Incontinence

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Women who compete in triathlons are at increased risk for pelvic floor disorders, including incontinence, and other health problems, a new study says.

“There has been a surge in popularity of high-impact sports such as triathlons, but little has been known until now about the prevalence of pelvic health and certain other issues associated with endurance training and events,” study author Dr. Colleen Fitzgerald, a physiatrist at Loyola University Health System, said in a university news release.

The term “pelvic floor” refers to the muscles that support the pelvic organs, such as the uterus, bladder or bowel.

Researchers surveyed more than 300 female triathletes, with a median age range of 35 to 44. On average, they ran 3.7 days a week, cycled 2.9 days a week and swam 2.4 days a week.

One-third said they had pelvic floor disorder symptoms, such as urgency urinary incontinence (16 percent), stress urinary incontinence (37 percent), bowel incontinence (28 percent) and pelvic organ prolapse (5 percent).

The survey also revealed that 29 percent of the women had abnormal bone density, 24 percent had menstrual irregularities, and 22 percent had disordered eating. These are components of the so-called female athlete triad, according to the study, which is to be presented Thursday at an American Urogynecologic Society meeting in Washington, D.C.

While the research shows an association between triathlon training and certain health issues, it doesn’t establish a cause-and-effect relationship.

Pelvic floor disorders and

Read more at: http://www.webmd.com/women/news/20140724/female-triathletes-may-face-health-problems-such-as-incontinence?src=RSS_PUBLIC

Unnecessary repeat biopsies for prostate cancer may be eliminated by new accurate epigenetic test

More than one million prostate biopsies are performed each year in the U.S. alone, including many repeat biopsies for fear of cancer missed. Therefore there is a need to develop diagnostic tests that will help avoid unnecessary repeat biopsies. Two independent trials have now validated the performance of an epigenetic test that could provide physicians with a better tool to help eliminate unnecessary repeat prostate biopsies, report investigators in The Journal of Urology®.

In the previously reported independent MATLOC (Methylation Analysis To Locate Occult Cancer) trial, a multiplex epigenetic assay (ConfirmMDx for Prostate Cancer) profiling the APC, GSTP1 and RASSF1 genes demonstrated a negative predictive value of 90%. GSTP1 methylation is a specific biomarker for (prostate) cancer and this gene is methylated in up to 90% of prostate cancer cases. Additionally, APC and RASSF1 are important field effect markers and increase the diagnostic sensitivity of the assay.

A second multicenter study, DOCUMENT (Detection Of Cancer Using Methylated Events in Negative Tissue), has validated the performance of the epigenetic assay used in the MATLOC trial as an independent predictor of prostate cancer risk to guide decision making for repeat biopsy. In the DOCUMENT study patients with a negative biopsy were evaluated to identify those at low risk for harboring cancer missed, through biopsy sampling error, who could forego an unnecessary repeat biopsy. The validation study resulted in a negative predictive value of 88%.

“This epigenetic assay is a significant, independent predictor and has been shown to be the most valuable diagnostic aid of all

Read more at: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/279959.php

Weight Loss Surgery May Help Ease Urinary Incontinence

Can Weight Loss Surgery Ease Urinary Incontinence?

By Kathleen Doheny

HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, July 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Weight-loss surgery appears to have an additional side benefit — it may improve urinary incontinence symptoms in women, according to a new study.

The study found that nearly half of women in a weight-loss surgery program reported having incontinence prior to the procedure. After surgery, most of those women said their urinary symptoms either improved or disappeared, said study researcher Dr. Leslee Subak, professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine.

The women “lost almost 30 percent of their body weight, and about two-thirds who had incontinence at the start were cured at one year with that amount of weight loss. Among those who continued to have incontinence, their incontinence frequency improved a lot,” Subak said.

Subak’s team is due to present the findings this week at the American Urogynecologic Society and the International Urogynecological Association 2014 scientific meeting in Washington, D.C. Studies presented at medical meetings are typically viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

The women included in the study were severely obese, with a median BMI of 46. A women who is 5 feet 4 inches tall who weighs 268 pounds has a BMI of 46.

Health experts refer to obesity and incontinence as the “twin epidemics.” That’s because 25 to 50 percent of women have urinary incontinence, according to Subak. Of those, 70 percent are obese, she

Read more at: http://www.webmd.com/urinary-incontinence-oab/news/20140723/weight-loss-surgery-may-help-ease-urinary-incontinence?src=RSS_PUBLIC

Biomarkers Discovered For Prostate Cancer Detection, Recurrence

Main Category: Prostate / Prostate Cancer
Also Included In: Genetics
Article Date: 15 May 2012 – 4:00 PDT

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Alterations to the “on-off” switches of genes occur early in the development of prostate cancer and could be used as biomarkers to detect the disease months or even years earlier than current approaches, a Mayo Clinic study has found. These biomarkers – known as DNA methylation profiles – also can predict if the cancer is going to recur and if that recurrence will remain localized to the prostate or, instead, spread to other organs. The study, published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, is the first to capture the methylation changes that occur across the entire human genome in prostate cancer.

The discovery could someday help physicians diagnose prostate cancer earlier and make more effective treatment decisions to improve cure rates and reduce deaths. It also points to the development of new drugs that reverse the DNA methylation changes, turning the “off” switch back “on” and returning the genetic code to its normal, noncancerous state.

“Our approach is more accurate and reliable than the widely used PSA (prostate-specific antigen) test,” says senior author Krishna Donkena, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic molecular biologist.

The PSA test detects any prostate abnormality, whether inflammation, cancer, infection or enlargement, while the DNA methylation changes are specific to prostate cancer, she says.

Though the instructions for all the cell’s

Read more at: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/245390.php

Prostate cancer controlled for 10 years by robot-assisted surgery

Robot-assisted surgery to remove cancerous prostate glands is effective in controlling the disease for 10 years, according to a new study led by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital.

The study also suggested that traditional methods of measuring the severity and possible spread of the cancer together with molecular techniques might, with further research, help to create personalized, cost-effective treatment regimens for prostate cancer patients who undergo the surgical procedure.

The findings apply to men whose cancer has not spread beyond the prostate, and the results are comparable to the well-established and more invasive open surgery to remove the entire diseased prostate and some surrounding tissue.

The research study is published this month online in European Urology, the official journal of the European Association of Urology.

“Until our analysis, there was little available information on the long-term oncologic outcomes for patients who undergo robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, or RARP,” says Mireya Diaz, Ph.D., Director of Biostatistics at the Henry Ford’s Vattikuti Urology Institute (VUI) and lead author of the study.

“As one of the very first hospitals to establish a structured RARP program a little over a decade ago, we were able to determine the long-term effectiveness of the technique thanks to the continued feedback of our patients and the follow-up efforts of the VUI team,” Dr. Diaz adds.

The researchers followed 483 consecutive men who had cancer that had not spread outside the prostate and received RARP as their first treatment. All cases were from 2001 to 2003, the earliest years of Henry Ford’s robot-assisted prostate surgery

Read more at: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/279758.php